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For GAD exhibition entitled “the space we live in” on the occasion of the Venice Architecture

Biennale Markus Heinsdorff explores the properties and use of space. His central installation is the walk-in object “Paper Box House” made of recycled cardboard. It

is an art object as well as a “recyclable material and architectural vision”; on the subject of “building with recyclable material”;. Accompanying it, he shows photographs and texts with examples of traditional building methods, which he developed with the architect and author Christian Schittich from his their own archives. These simple yet expressive different “living spaces” are complemented by an urban space project by architect Markus Uhrig, who is pursuing the visualisation of and references to urban development and its history, in this case in Munich, Germany.

 

Project, working title: Paper Box House

Object - Installation

by Markus Heinsdorff - - installation artist

Material, dimensions: cardboard made of recycled material, wood glue 4.40 m long,

3.54 m wide, high 4.20 m

 

In the GAD exhibition, a house made of recycled cardboard (honeycomb) is to be created as a self- supporting lightweight constructionstructure and . iIn addition, a seat, table and lounger made of stackable recycled cardboard boxes as fruit and vegetable crates. The 4.40 m long and 3.54 m wide façade and the roof made of cardboard result in an interior space of 13 square metres, which is

accessible and invites people to linger. With the “house”; was built by the Munich installation artist Markus Heinsdorff, who wants to show that simple and at the same time well-designed buildings can also be constructed as rooms or even houses from recycled material. There is a great need for this. The need for this is great, as, after all, more than 70 million people are currently homeless worldwide and more than one billion live in inadequate housing. And theis number is growing rapidly -

climate change, environmental disasters, wars and not least the enormous population growth in the

world’s less developed regions are the known causesreasons. Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, the director of the renowned Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, took this as an opportunity to call on architects to “direct their ambitions not towards the construction of high-tech skyscrapers”, but towards the design of low-cost and, if possible, climate-neutral houses that can be built by their inhabitants themselves. He recommends waste as a sustainable building material, which. This is available free of charge almost everywhere in the world. At the same time, its reuse also solves the problem of waste disposal, which should not be underestimated - if not completely, at least to a lesser extent - especially in less developed countries without functioning recycling systems. For Markus Heinsdorff, who sees himself at the interface between art and architecture and wants to give impulses to the building industry with his installations, building with recycled material or waste or "recyclable material"; as a cheap and sustainable building material has long been an issue. The experience he has gained from his previous lightweight constructions - including mobile pavilions for China and India and the highly regarded German-Chinese House at the Expo 2010 in Shanghai - as well as numerous stays in poorer regions prompted him to develop technically innovative and at the same time well- designed low-cost buildings especially for the numerous slums and townships in Africa. 

 

 

MARKUS HEINSDORFF

THE SPACE WE LIVE IN

with the participation of
MARKUS UHRIG
CHRISTIAN SCHITTICH


curated by
PIER PAOLO SCELSI

with the partnership of
COOP ALLEANZA 3.0
PASINGER FABRIK MUNICH

and with the kind support of
CONSOLATO GENERALE DELLA REPUBBLICA FEDERALE DI GERMANIA

with technical support of
COMIDES Vedelago TV

with the kind support and cooperation of
LOW COST LAB at the EBB - Chair of Building Costruction and Material Science
TUM Department of Architecture 
Technical University of Munich
with
Dipl.-Ing. Benedikt Hartl, Architect


 

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